Michael Zev Gordon (b 1963)
200 PIECES Into the Rose Garden (world premiere)

Luiz De Campos oboe

Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679-1745)
Trio Sonata No 4 in G minor, ZWV 181

Andante
Allegro
Adagio
Allegro ma non troppo

Fergus McCready and Christopher Vettraino oboe
Florence Plane bassoon
Timothy Jones
harpsichord
Jared Prokop double bass

Tonia Ko (b 1988)
200 PIECES Tilt (world premiere)

Hugo Mak bassoon

Sally Beamish (b 1956)
Aquarium

Lucy Driver, Kamilla Dancsa and Da Som Jeong flute
Angus McCall cello

Emma-Kate Matthews (b 1986)
200 PIECES Cloth Wall in Wind (world premiere)

Michele Prokop bass clarinet

Gordon McPherson (b 1965)
3 Minute Philosophy

Daniel Swani, Peter Havlat and Rebecca Park flute
Quentin Broyart
percussion

Born in London, Michael Zev Gordon is a composer of highly crafted, powerfully expressive works. Influences from his wide range of teachers – Robin Holloway, Oliver Knussen, Franco Donatoni, Louis Andriessen and John Woolrich – have coalesced into an eclectic, individual voice, the tonal and atonal happily rubbing shoulders in his music; memory, time and a search for the serene have been recurring subjects.

Gordon has written for a wide range of genres, and his works have been performed by many leading performers, including the BBC Symphony Orchestra, Birmingham Contemporary Music Group, London Sinfonietta, the Choir of King’s College Cambridge, Carolin Widmann, Huw Watkins, Nicholas Daniel, Toby Spence and Alina Ibragimova. Gordon has twice won the choral category of the British Composer Awards, the Prix Italia, and, in 2009, On Memory, his NMC piano music portrait disc, was in The Times's top 10 contemporary CDs. A second portrait disc, of chamber music, on Resonus Classics, was released to critical acclaim in 2019, and features the Fidelio Trio and clarinettist Julian Bliss.

Projects in 2020 and 2021 include a third string quartet, for the Bozzini Quartet, and a new chamber opera – The Fall of Icarus. Gordon is strongly committed to working with students, amateur and younger players. He has led composition teaching on the Contemporary Music for Amateurs summer school, was Director of the Cheltenham Festival of Music Composer Academy from 2016-18, and has been commissioned to write a new orchestral work for the London Schools Symphony Orchestra for their 70th anniversary, at the Barbican in 2021. Gordon has taught composition at the universities of Southampton and Durham, the Royal College of Music, the Royal Northern College of Music, and has also been invited to work with composers and performers internationally, including at Juilliard, Vanderbilt University, Oxford University, Antwerp Conservatorium and the Hong Kong Philharmonic. Since 2012, Gordon has been Professor of Composition at the University of Birmingham.

Tonia Ko has been commissioned by leading soloists and ensembles, and performed at venues such as Walt Disney Concert Hall, Carnegie Hall, Kennedy Center, and the Tanglewood Music Center, Aspen Music Festival, and the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival. Internationally, her work has been featured at the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival, Royaumont Académie Voix Nouvelles, Shanghai Conservatory New Music Week, Young Composers Meeting at Apeldoorn, and Thailand International Composition Festival. She has received grants and awards from the Barlow Foundation, Fromm Music Foundation, Chamber Music America, American Academy of Arts and Letters, Broadcast Music, Inc as well as residencies at MacDowell Colony, The Copland House, and Djerassi Resident Artist Program. She served as the 2015-2017 Composer-in-Residence for Young Concert Artists.

Presenters of her work encompass a broad range of the music scene. Notable recent projects include Plain, Air for the Spektral Quartet in conjunction with Openlands Lakeshore Preserve, Soothe A Tooth for violist Stephen Upshaw of the Riot Ensemble, and The Sea as Fallacy for Berlin Counterpoint.

In the attempt to follow aural, visual, and tactile instincts in a holistic way, Ko increasingly mediates between the identities of composer, sound artist, and visual artist. This has sparked interdisciplinary connections— most prominently Breath, Contained, an ongoing series of works using bubble wrap as a canvas for both art and sound. Her visual and installation work has been further supported by a residency at the Studios at MASS MoCA in the summer of 2017.

Ko was born in Hong Kong and raised in Honolulu. She earned a BM with Highest Distinction from the Eastman School of Music and an MM from Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. At IU, she served as Associate Instructor of Music Theory and was awarded the Georgina Joshi Commission Prize. She holds a DMA from Cornell University, where she studied with Steven Stucky and Kevin Ernste. She was the 2018-19 Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Chicago’s Center for Contemporary Composition and was appointed Lecturer in Composition at Royal Holloway, University of London in 2020.

Emma-Kate Matthews is undertaking a PhD at the Bartlett School of Architecture UCL, under the supervision of Bob Sheil and Yeoryia Manolopoulou, and Neil Heyde from the Royal Academy of Music.

Her spatialised compositions have been performed at the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, Southbank Centre and LSO St Luke's. She plays multiple instruments including the clarinet, drum kit and electric bass, and has released a number of albums, most recently East of the Active on Algebra Records. Her work has been exhibited at the Royal Academy of Arts and the RIBA, and has also been published in multiple peer-reviewed journals including Architectural Design (Wiley), Design Ecologies (Intellect books) and Organised Sound Journal (Cambridge University Press). She has recently completed commissions for the Guildhall School of Music & Drama, Musicity and the Barbican Centre as part of the 'Sound Unbound' festival.

In December 2019 she organised and presented at the Sound (Of) Space Symposium, funded by the Australian Research Council. Most recently, she composed for the London Symphony Orchestra as part of the Panufnik Composers' scheme.